Tuesday 25 June 2024

June 25th 1964 test flight of X15A-2

 On June 25th 1964 Major Bob Rushworth makes the first flight in the modified number two X-15 research rocket craft. In this flight , X-15A-2 reached a top speed of 2,966 mph and a maximum altitude of some 83,000 feet.

Before this flight the aircraft had undergone a mating checkout test flight in which it remained attached to the parent B52 (conducted June 11th ) , followed by a free fall flight to evaluate further the craft’s capabilities before a powered test.



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Monday 24 June 2024

The unpredictable June Bootid Meteor Shower

 I know we are in summer and that it does not get dark until very late in the evening but there is the possibility of seeing one of the most unpredictable meteor showers of the year this week.

On the night of June 27th/28th the June Bootid meteor shower will be active. Normally not a very inspiring meteor shower, occasionally in the past  it has sprung surprises on astronomers. Could this happen this year?

A meteor shower is named after the constellation where all the meteors seem to start from, in this case the June Bootids are named after the constellation of Bootes the Herdsman

Meteor showers relate to comets which are dirty snowballs travelling around the Sun. They leave a trail of dust behind the, If the Earth passes through such a dust stream we see a meteor shower.

Some people however call them shooting stars, they are nothing to do with stars. They are simply grains of dust burning up in the Earth’s atmosphere.

The comet associated with the June Bootids is comet Pons Winnecke. On a normal year maybe 1 or 2 meteors per hour are seen, but there have been outbursts of meteor activity in 1916, 1921, 1927 and most recently in 1998 when around 100 meteors per hour were seen.

 


What about this year? We don’t know but if it is clear on the night of June 27th/28th have a look outside when its dark and if you see any meteors the chances are they are June Bootids,


                                                   www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

The Astronomy Show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country. 

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations


 The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

Sunday 23 June 2024

P Eridanus and a Cooke telescope

 The star p Eridani (not rho) is one of the most interesting double stars in the southern hemisphere. It is a double stars that had been observed since 1826. 

 Two astronomers making observations up until 1908, Mr Nangle using a 6.5 inch telescope and Mr Hirst using a 4.5 inch telescope both made by Thomas Cooke & Sons of York, agree that the distance between the two components of p Eridani are getting closer.

 Today we know that the system contains 2 K class main sequence stars orbiting each other every 475 years.


                                                        www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Saturday 22 June 2024

New appointment at British Aircraft Company in 1964

 In June 1964 The British Aircraft Company announces that Mr A R Adams B.Sc (Encom) FCIS has been appointed secretary of the British Aircraft Company (Guided Weapons) Ltd.



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Friday 21 June 2024

Alpha Centauri seen from Australia in 1906

 Alpha Centauri one of the leading double stars in the southern hemisphere was observed by G D Hirst using his 4.25 inch Cooke telescope and James Nangle using his 6.25 inch Cooke telescope in Australia in June and July 1906.



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Thursday 20 June 2024

A Dark transit of Titan

On November 5th / 6th 1907 Mr A B Cobham and Mr G D Hirst using a 4.5 inch Thomas Cooke & Son telescope in Australia saw a dark spot on Saturn. This was afterwards ascertained to be Titan. 

They also both commented that they caught glimpse of the edge of the ring at flashes, the impression indicating the extreme fineness and delicacy of the rings when seen edgewise


                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Wednesday 19 June 2024

Partial solar eclipse My 25th 1900

The eclipse was observed using the G J Newbegin  9 inch Cooke telescope with a power of 75  by Mrs Newbegin and Rev T E R Phillips using the projection method. The image produced was 4.2 inches in diameter.



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Tuesday 18 June 2024

Summer Solstice

 This month summer officially begins. At 9.50 pm on June 20 the Sun reaches its most northerly point in the sky, marking the instant in time known as the Northern Hemisphere's summer solstice. The nights will be at their shortest for the next few weeks, making it difficult to see the stars until very late in the evening. In the Southern Hemisphere of course, winter officially begins.

People will be at Stonehenge on the morning of June 21st as the Sun rises at 04.52 am

One things astronomers like about midsummer's day is that after this date the length of night time slowly begins to increase.



                                                      www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk




Monday 17 June 2024

The Astronomy show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country. 

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations.



The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

 

Moon close to Antares 'The Rival of Mars'

 It doesn’t get dark until late on June evenings but there are still some great things that can be seen in the sky with the naked eye.

Even on bright evenings the Moon cannot be missed and there is a great opportunity to see it either side of the bright red star Antares in the constellation of the Scorpion on the 19th and 20th of June.



As soon as it gets dark look to the south where you will see the Moon. On the 19th the Moon will be to the right of Antares while on the 20th it will be to the left.

Antares is always seen low in the sky from Britain which is a shame because it is a fantastic object in the sky. It I a red supergiant star. In fact it is so big that the orbits of the planets Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars could all fit inside the star. Antares is sometimes known as the ‘Rival of Mars’ because of its bright red hue.



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Sunday 16 June 2024

June 1964 update on John Glenn

It was announced on the 13th June 1964 that Lt Col John Glenn has recovered sufficiently from his inner ear complaint that he can now work in his garden and go for walks.

Dr Charles Berry of the Manned Spacecraft Centre said, “He is much better ha a month ago”



                                                      www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk



Saturday 15 June 2024

New director for ASGARD in 1964

 In June 1964, Dr William P Jones, previously superintendent of the Aerodynamics division National Physics Laboratory, London is appointed to the post of director of ASGARD. 

He is to take up his duties in NASA’s Advisory Group on Aeronautical Research and Development in July this year.


                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Friday 14 June 2024

W M Baxter and a Cooke telescope

 W M Baxter used a 5 inch Cooke equatorial in Edinburgh to observe a series of occultations of stars  during the partial eclipse of the Moon on the night of 16th-17th December 1899. He observed 10 stars before fog and cloud prevented further observations



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Thursday 13 June 2024

Sunspots seen from Reading with a Cooke telescope

 In 1896 the Rev J H Jenkinson of St Mary’s vicarage  Reading, Berks described a series of sunspot drawings he had made between February and August of that year. He used a 4.5 inch Thomas Cooke of York telescope.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Wednesday 12 June 2024

First flight of the UK Blue Streak rocket in 1964

On June 5th 1964 the first successful launch of the Hawker Siddeley Dynamics Blue Streak rocket was made. It was described as a text book launch. Lift off occurred from Woomera’s Pad 6A at 00.44 BST (09.14 local time) and all primary mission objectives were achieved.

The rocket motors shut off at +147 seconds rather than the planned +153 seconds. This meant that the rocket landed in the Australian desert 600 miles from Woomera rather than the planned 960 miles.

A readjustment of the Blue Streak autopilot is to be made before the next flight to prevent an occurrence of an early shut down of the motor.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Tuesday 11 June 2024

Partial Lunar eclipse observed by GJ Newbein in 1892

 The Partial Lunar Eclipse of May 11-12, 1892. By G. J. NEWBEGIN, F.R.A.S.

 

The night of May 11-12 turned out so exceptionally clear and fine that (though in 16 ° of Declination) the moon soon became a steady object in the telescope. With regard to the eclipse I decided to take a series of photographs at about half-hour intervals, and to endeavour to secure a permanent record of its several stages. The exposures were made at 9.20, 9.50, 10.30, 11, 11.30 p.m., 12 o'clock midnight, and 12.30 a.m. The periods of exposure were varied, to allow for the decreasing illumination of the moon, viz. :— 20s 20s 30s 40s 30s 20s 20s respectively.

 

The plates were the Ilford ordinary, developed by hydroquinone. The instrument by which they were taken is a 9-inch Cooke equatorial, aperture reduced to 2-inch for the whole series. The intervals between the exposures were occupied in developing the plates.

 

Thorpe, Norwich, Nov. 11, 1892.



                                                      www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Monday 10 June 2024

The Astronomy Show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country. 

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations.

The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM 

New observatory in Catania with a Cooke telescope

 This observatory which was completed in 1890 in Catania, Sicily is principally for astrophysics, celestial photography, meteorology and seismology. There is a 6-inch Cooke fitted with photographic apparatus; Huggins's apparatus for photographing the solar corona; 



                                                          www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Friday 7 June 2024

The Mallory, Irvine attempt on Mt Everest in 1924 recorded with Thomas Cooke camera lens

 On June 8th 1924 George Mallory and Andrew Sandy Irvine attempted to become the first people to climb to the summit of Mount Everest. To this day no one is sure if they made it or not.

The expedition was captured on camera the instrument used was a Newman Sinclair camera with a Thomas Cooke lens and drive system



                                                          www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Till robbery by Cooke worker

York Herald Saturday 16th March 1867 

Till Robbery 

Henry Petch of Market Street, York a mechanic of Messrs Cooke and Sons, was charged with stealing 2 shillings from a till in the George Inn Tap, Coney Street, York. On the previous evening the defendant entered the tap and asked for liquor. He was served, after which James Allen, the occupant of the place, went up stairs. When he came down, from certain suspicions he examined the till and found that a 2 shilling piece had been stolen. 

He went out to fetch a policeman upon which the prisoner,- who was the only person who had been in the place, ran away. He was found concealed in a corner in a yard behind the tap, and thence was taken away into custody. The prosecutor stated that he had been similarly robbed before, and his suspicions had fallen upon the prisoner as the thief. In defence the prisoner said he was innocent, and had only gone into the yard behind the tap for his convenience. 

The bench were of the opinion, however that he was guilty of theft, and sentenced hi to be imprisoned in the House of Correction for 14 days. 



                                                     www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Tuesday 4 June 2024

A new Clinometer from Thomas Cooke

 York Herald Saturday 25th November 1865

 

We (Bombay Builder) have had the pleasure of seeing a most compact and useful clinometer and manufactured by Messrs T Cooke & Sons London and York. We understand the government intends to issue them to the public works department; and we have every reason to believe that the instrument will be generally made use of by the railway and other professional men for trial work.

 

A gentleman who has used the instrument says, “It is impossible to over rate the advantage of this instrument, A trial path, which would have required weeks to set out by chain and level as it would have been necessary to cut down the jungle and make platforms for the instrument to stand on, was marked out in a few days and with quite as much accuracy.

 

The only mistakes that can arise are from the accidental slipping of one of the cross pieces , or from moving one of the radial arms of the instrument. It is only requisite to take a glance at the face of the instrument while the hand rests upon the cross piece, to ensure its accuracy. The ease and quickness with which the instrument was used made the marking out of the trail path  a pleasure to the observer, who would feel like Pegasus deprived of his wings if he had to do another under similar circumstances with level and chain instead of clinometer.



                                                       www.theramblingastronomr.co.uk

Monday 3 June 2024

The Astronomy Show

Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country. 

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations.



The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

 

Thomas Cooke telescope for sale in India

 Civil and Military Gazette (Lahore) Saturday 3rd January 1891 

For sale Owner leaving India 

An equatorial telescope of 6 inches aperture by T Cooke & Sons, York driven by clockwork, with stellar and solar eyepieces. 

Also the revolving roof or dome (16 feet diameter) of sheet zinc on teak framing, covering the telescope. 

H B Hederstedt, late Chief Engineer of the Oude and Rohilkund Railway, Lucknow


                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

 

Sunday 2 June 2024

Blue Streak motor test in 1964

 A static test firing is made of a rocket engine developed at the ROCKET PROPULSION EST, Westcott, Bucks, that could be used as a second stage motor in conjunction with BLUE STREAK.

The test was entirely successful, being part of a series of firings designed to increase solid propellant thrust efficiencies. 



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk


Saturday 1 June 2024

Goonhilly Station out of operation for part of 1964

 The General Post Office announces that the Goonhill Station, Cornwall is being converted to enable it to receive signals from the EARLY BIRD communications satellite. 

Goonhilly will be out of operation for six months from September 1964. All transatlantic comsat tests and transmissions will be handled by the French station at Pleumeur-Bodou.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Friday 31 May 2024

758 Mancuria

 On May 18th 1912 Harry Edwin Wood who was chief assistant at the Union Observatory in South Africa discovered an asteroid, it was named Mancuria after the city in which he was born, Manchester. He would discover 12 asteroids between 1911-1932. 

Mancuria is the Latin name for Manchester



                                                        www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

 

Thursday 30 May 2024

Thomas Cooke telescope at 1881 York Exhibition

In the space intervening between the central and Great Halls, a large equatorial mounted telescope which stands 15 feet high is exhibited by Messrs T Cooke & Sons York opticians, the instrument which is an object of curiosity with an object glass of 10 inches. 

The sale price is £1200  today that telescope would cost over £183,000



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Wednesday 29 May 2024

Brussels observatory 15 inch Thomas Cooke telescope

On May 15th 1880 the telescope for the Belgium Government may be inspected at the Cooke works in York. 

Messrs T Cooke & Sons, opticians of this city, had the honour some time ago of receiving an order from the Belgium Government for an equatorial mounting for a telescope with an object glass of 15 inches diameter, which is to be placed in the Royal Observatory Brussels. 

The work has just been completed, and the instrument presents a fine specimen of mechanical art and skill. The tube about 21 feet in length, and the stand 13 feet high. The instrument is fitted with all the latest appliances, including clockwork of very delicate construction by which the telescope caused to follow the movement of the star on which it is fixed. The firm expect to pack and forward the instrument towards the end of the month.



                                                        www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

 

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Monday 27 May 2024

The Astronomy Show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country. 

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations .


The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

 

Thomas Cooke and the hydraulic lift at York Bank

On Monday 28th December 1874 the spacious new and enlarged bank offices in Parliament Street, which have been in progress of erection during the last eighteen months, for the use of this company, will be opened to the public for business. The present bank was erected in 1835.

Below there is ample strong room accommodation which is connected to the bank by means of ingenious hydraulic lifts, provided by Messrs T Cooke and Sons.



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

 

Friday 10 May 2024

Thomas Cooke telescope and an observatory for sale in Liverpool in 1885

 Pall Mall Gazette Friday 2nd January 1885 

 

ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY WITH  TELESCOPE AND APPOINTMENTS COMPLETE. 

To be SOLD, a bargain, on account of the owner's eyesight, an excellent Equatorial-mounted  TELESCOPE by Cooke, 4.5 inch diam.; Dawe's solar and numerous other eyepieces, micrometer, induction  coil and battery, automatic and star spectroscopes, spark condenser, clock by Cooke, barometer 7-10  diam., observing chair, complete sets of the memoirs and monthly notice's of the R.A.S., Astronomical Register and Observatory,  with indexes, and a number of other astronautical works, all in the best possible condition. The above presents a very rate opportunity  to astronomical students 

Address  "Telescope," care of Lee and Nightingale, Advertising Agents,  Liverpool.



                                                     www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Thursday 9 May 2024

Thomas Cooke telescope for sale in Liverpool in 1875

 Liverpool Daily Post Thursday 5th August 1875 

Second hand astronomical telescope for sale by the late Mr Cooke of York- G S Wood (late Abraham & Co) Opticians 20 Lord Street Liverpool.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

 


Monday 6 May 2024

The Astronomy Show

Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country. 

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations 



The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

Saturday 4 May 2024

Thomas Cooke telescope for sale in Leeds in 1879

 In the Leeds Mercury Thursday 13th March 1879 an advert read 

A Splendid Telescope for Sale by Cooke of York, object glass 4.5 inches diameter; equatorial bearings, micrometer &c, in large circular house with moveable top. Apply Anthony Robinson 27 Upperhead- row, Leeds






Friday 3 May 2024

Mr Dansken and his Cooke telescope at Patrickhill, Glasgow

John Dansken who was born in Glasgow in 1836 was by profession a surveyor and an enthusiastic amateur astronomer who built an observatory at his home in Patrickhill, Glasgow which included a 5 inch telescope by Thomas Cooke of York, there was also a larger 13 inch reflector made by D Hunter of Lanark.

A number of smaller instruments were also housed there including telescopes by Wray and Dollond. He also had one of the finest astronomical libraries in the West of Scotland. John Dansken died in 1905.



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Monday 29 April 2024

The Astronomy Show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country.

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations.


The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

Saturday 27 April 2024

A Cooke telescope for Wetherby

 In 1864 the Rev J Holroyd of Wetherby in Yorkshire purchased a 3.5 inch telescope. The telescope was fitted up in the way that was shown on a visit to the show room in York.



                                                        www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Thursday 25 April 2024

A Cooke telescope in Angus

 John Robertson of Coupar Angus 1830-1920 owned a fine Thomas Cooke of York 3 inch refractor telescope. His interest in astronomy began in 1848 when he heard Dr Thomas Dick give a series of astronomical lectures.

He spent many hours observing the sky, including sunspot observations and comets and meteors. He was self educated and he had to fit all his observations of the sky around his work. He was employed by the Caledonian Railway.

He sent many articles to newspapers including the Scotsman and some of the Dundee Daily newspapers. Among the astronomers he correspond with were Sir W.H. M. Christie, Richard A Proctor, Sir Robert Ball and Ralph Copeland.

He was still using the 3 inch Cooke telescope as late as August 1917 to observe sunspots, with his advanced age his daughter had to help move and adjust the telescope.



                                                       www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Tuesday 23 April 2024

Transit of Mercury seen from Liverpool with a Cooke telescope in 1868

George Williams using a 4.25 inch Cooke & Sons telescope observed the transit of Mercury on November 5th 1868 from 2, Devonshire Road, Prince’s Park, Liverpool.

Williams observed no apparent elongation or pear shape, or black drop at the egress of the planet; but the boiling of the limb, which was considerable, may account for the absence of these appearances.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk



Monday 22 April 2024

The Astronomy Show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country.

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations 



The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

Martian moons seen with a Cooke telescope in Sunderland in 1881

On December 22nd 1881 John Watson of Sunderland (more accurately Seaham Harbour, which is about 5 miles south of Sunderland) reported seeing two small points of light near Mars using a Thomas Cooke & Sons 12inch refractor. The positions of the moons were determined by using the ephemeris of Mars is indicated where the two satellite should be.

I have little more information regarding either this 12 inch telescope or observations made by it. Although it is mentioned in G F Chambers Handbook of Descriptive and Practical Astronomy vol. 2 Oxford 1890 page 297.

Watson had an 8 inch Wray telescope mounted on a metal pillar supplied by Thomas Cooke which he offered for sale in 1880 presumably to make room for the 12 inch Cooke.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Sunday 21 April 2024

The full moon in April is the Egg Moon

 The Full Moon on April 23rd  is called the Egg Moon. This has nothing at all to do with Easter eggs but is due to the increasing amount of daylight which results in hens, ducks and geese laying more eggs.



                                                        www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Friday 19 April 2024

Astronomer restaurant closes in Halifax

 William Herschel (1783-1822) would become famous for his discovery of the planet Uranus in 1781. He did however have a connection with Yorkshire albeit musical rather than astronomical.

In 1762 he obtained the post of director of public concerts at Leeds a post that he held for four years. He moved to Halifax in 1766 where he was the organist at St John the Baptist church now Halifax Minster. 

In Halifax in 2022 a new restaurant called The Astronomer was opened to celebrate the connection between Halifax and Herschel. Sadly in April 2024 the restaurant which was in the Piece Hall the oldest surviving Georgian cloth hall closed due to financial reasons.



                                                        www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk


Thursday 18 April 2024

Even a Cooke telescope cannot see through trees

 Mt T H Waller of York in 1865 using a 4.75 inch Cooke telescope was trying to observe the satellites of Jupiter when unfortunately the planet was obscured by some trees and he was unable to see the immersion of the second satellite or the transit of the third. Fortunately by the time that the fourth satellite was passing in front of Jupiter it had cleared the trees.

Mr Waller was also a very keen double star observer he would often the double star catalogue of Mr Brothers of Manchester and the Bedford Catalogue.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk




Monday 1 April 2024

The Astronomy Show

 Join me, Martin Lunn MBE tonight and every Monday evening from 7.00 pm-9.00 pm on the Astronomy Show, probably the only regular astronomy show on any radio station in the country.

I will take my weekly look at the night sky and look at all the latest news in astronomy. There will be the astronomical anniversaries this week plus the A-Z of Constellations.



The Astronomy Show every Monday evening only on Drystone Radio live on line at www.drystoneradio.com DAB radio in Bradford and East Lancashire, or 102 and 103.5 FM and can also be heard later on the Drystone Radio Podcast.

Sunday 31 March 2024

Mr Tetley of Leeds, sunspots and a Cooke telescope

 In October 1930 Mr Tetley of Headingley, Leeds used his 4 inch Thomas Cooke & Sons telescope to observe the Sun. He took some photographs of the great sun spot group of October that year. In particular on October 10th the photographs very clearly showed the changes which took place in the groups which crossed the central meridian

I am not sure if the telescope had a photo visual lens or not.



                                                         www.theramblingastronomer.co.uk

Friday 29 March 2024

TIROS 1

 Weather is always a major talking point between people, it can be hot, cold, wet or dry.

We are also used to getting fantastic images beamed done from weather satellites orbiting the Earth showing just what the weather is going to be, this includes incredible pictures of hurricanes from space.

However all these modern satellites can trace their time lines back to TIROS 1 the very first weather satellite which was launched on April 1st 1960. TIROS stands for Television Infrared Observation Satellites.

TIROS 1 was an experimental weather satellite built by NASA and would operate until June 1960 when an electoral fault occurred and the probe failed.

Although the pictures it sent back are poor by the standards of today it showed what could be done to help meteorologists predict the weather today.



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